Gutenberg 0.2.0 Released, Adds New Custom HTML and Cover Image Blocks

The Gutenberg plugin is moving fast with version 0.2.0 now available. This is the first release since the plugin was added to the directory last week. It includes two new block types, along with other new features, improvements, and fixes for many bugs that previously severely impaired the editor’s usability.

A new Custom HTML block allows users to add HTML and click to see a fast preview within the editor.

The new Cover Image block lets users place an image in the content with the background image fixed by default. Users can also specify text to have overlaid. Gutenberg developers emphasized that this feature should not be confused with the “Featured Image” panel which is already working in a similar way to how it has in the past.

While testing the Cover Image block with Twenty Seventeen and Twenty Fifteen, I was unable to get it working correctly on the frontend. Within the editor it works beautifully but once I launched the preview I found that, regardless of which positioning option I chose, I could not get the full image to display. The size of the image’s output was only as tall as the overlay text. If there was a right way to position it, I was unable to discover it. Bugs like these are likely to be quickly ironed out as more users begin testing.

A few of the notable fixes and improvements include the following:

  • Added button to delete a block
  • Added button to open block settings in the inspector
  • Rename “Freeform” block to “Classic Text”
  • Added support for pages and custom post types
  • Added ability to select all blocks with ctrl/command+A
  • Automatically generate wrapper class for styling blocks
  • Avoid triggering multi-select on right click
  • Avoid being keyboard trapped on editor content

As of today, Gutenberg has more than 500 active installs. The development team is planning on shipping weekly releases to the WordPress.org plugin. If you want to keep up with the releases, subscribe to the make.wordpress.org/core blog. Feedback is welcome on Gutenberg’s GitHub repository as well as in the #core-editor channel on WordPress Slack.

Source: wp tavern

Tone-deaf cop addresses real-life shooting while playing video games


This week, a Seattle police officer chose to talk about the death of a pregnant woman at the hands of his fellow officers … while livestreaming a video game. On June 18th, officers came to Charleena Lyles‘ home to investigate a burglary she reported. Lyles, a pregnant mother of four, was then killed in a scuffle with the officers. Some of the details of the case are unclear, but it’s known for sure three of her children were home at the time. It’s a deeply upsetting case that has raised troubling questions about the officers’ use of force. One officer recapped…

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Source: The Next Web

Así luce la nueva App Store de Chicago, con un MacBook gigante en el techo

Chicagomacbookstore 1

En diciembre de 2016 les contamos en Applesfera que la compañía de la manzana tenía planes de construir la que podría ser una nueva Flagship Apple Store en Chicago, Estados Unidos. Pues bien, la idea se materializó y en las últimas horas hemos podido ver cómo ha avanzado este proyecto, que cuenta con paredes de cristal y un techo de fibra de carbono que tiene forma de un MacBook gigante.

Desde luego no era para menos, debido a que esta tienda está situada en una de las ubicaciones más emblemáticas de la ciudad, cerca al puente de la avenida Michigan. Continue reading “Así luce la nueva App Store de Chicago, con un MacBook gigante en el techo”

I trained a neural network to create CIA malware codenames


The Central Intelligence Agency is America’s best-known intelligence agency, but it’s still shrouded in secrecy. Thanks to Wikileaks, we’ve learned a lot about its internal workings, particularly when it comes to cyber-espionage. One thing that I’ve come to appreciate is the humorous bent to how the CIA names its internal projects. There are some absolute howlers. My favorite is, of course, Gaping hole of DOOM. Other honorable mentions include Munge Payload, McNugget, RoidRage, and Philosoraptor. If you’re curious, TechCrunch has published a near-exhaustive list of them. Pretty imaginative stuff. This got me thinking, neural networks are great at naming things…

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Source: The Next Web

WordPress 4.9 to Focus on Managing Plugins and Themes, Gutenberg Targeted for 5.0


photo credit: Oli Dale

Matt Mullenweg, the overall product lead for core releases in 2017, has published an overview for what users can expect in WordPress versions 4.9 and 5.0. After the success of 4.8 and the initial release of Gutenberg last week, Mullenweg is aiming to see the plugin installed on 100K+ sites during the next few months before merging it into core. He also suggested that WordPress could put a promo for the plugin in the upcoming 4.8.1 release.

“In the meantime I think we can do another user-focused 4.9 release with the theme of editing code and managing plugins and themes, doing v2s and polishing some features we brought into WP last year,” Mullenweg said. “Weston and Mel already have some good ideas there, and we can start to discuss and brainstorm at the Dev chat next week. This will also allow the Gutenberg-driven release to be 5.0, which is a nice-to-have but not the primary driver of this decision.”

Mullenweg elaborated on changes to the release process in a post on his personal blog. The original idea was for releases to be driven by improvements to the three focus areas (the editor, customizer, and REST API), but the radical changes that Gutenberg introduces to the editing experience means that customization improvements will need to wait until the editor is a little further along:

Mel and Weston took this as an opportunity to think about not just the “Customizer”, which is a screen and code base within WP, but really thinking in a user-centric way about what it means to customize a site and they identified a number of low-hanging fruits, areas like widgets where we could have a big user impact with relatively little effort.

WordPress is littered with little inconsistencies and gaps in the user experience that aren’t hard to fix, but are hard to notice the 500th time you’re looking at a screen.

I didn’t think we’d be able to sustain the effort on the editor and still do a meaningful user release in the meantime, but we did, and I think we can do it again.

During this week’s core development meeting, contributors brainstormed more specific items for inclusion in 4.9. The ability to schedule customizer changesets is one feature they discussed as a possibility. Customizer component co-maintainer Weston Ruter described the feature as “adding statuses for changesets: being able to draft a changeset to come back to later, and then to be able to schedule it to go live.”

The Customize Snapshots feature plugin contains the UI for this and Customize Changesets, the term for the underlying infrastructure required for saving a Customizer session as a draft, was added in WordPress 4.7. Adding the UI in WordPress 4.9 would allow users to share Customizer sessions, preview them outside of the iframe, and schedule them to publish at a future date.

Andrew Roberts, a contributor to TinyMCE, said they should have a new mobile-optimized UX, which would result in a responsive toolbar, that could land within the proposed 4.9 timeframe.

“I would wonder if we couldn’t tweak the UI to be closer to Gutenberg (e.g. white toolbars),” Roberts said. “I had raised this idea before and it was thought it was better to wait until Gutenberg, but I remain of the opinion we could iterate a little bit closer to get users used to it.”

Contributors also discussed the possibility of changing the default font in the editor to ease the transition to Gutenberg in the future. Currently, Gutenberg uses system fonts for UI and Noto Serif for the editor text.

Mel Choyce, who is heading the Customizer focus with Weston Ruter, said she hopes the team can finish the Gallery Widget for 4.9. Current progress on the widget can be found on GitHub.

WordPress 4.8.1 is tentatively planned for the last week in July, and contributors anticipate including a fix for some issues with the new Text Widget stripping out code.

Source: wp tavern

TRVL is the best travel platform you’re not using (yet)


From the moment I saw it, I was instantly enamored with TRVL. The brainchild of Dutch entrepreneur Jochem Wijnands, TRVL is a sort of mashup that turns each user into a travel agent with the potential to earn money for their recommendations. Think of it as TripAdvisor meets Airbnb and Skyscanner. Travelers, Wijnands says, are the best source of information for other travelers. And while the typical tourist spends hours scouring the web for information, TRVL puts all this information at your fingertips by leaving the guesswork to agents. These agents are locals (or highly familiar with a given area)…

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Source: The Next Web

Bethesda is bleeding gamers dry, and I’ve had enough


In case you were lucky enough to miss Bethesda’s tepid showing at E3 2017, blockbuster RPG The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim is getting yet another re-release. This time, it’s coming out, at least in part, in VR. If this were the first, or even the second time that Skyrim has resurfaced, I might not bat an eyelash. But since its release in 2011, it’s been re-released three times: for current gen consoles in 2016, and VR and Nintendo Switch this year. Hey Bethesda? I’d love to see you pack Skyrim away on a trophy shelf somewhere and move on to brighter new projects.…

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Source: The Next Web

It’s time to stop using video playback to measure battery life


When was the last time you bought a laptop  that lasted as long as advertised, especially if its a PC? Probably not any time recently. Problem is, manufacturers continue to insist on using video playback to measure battery life. That is, frankly, nonsensical; video playback is literally one of the most efficient things a modern processor can do, and using it to measure battery life creates wildly unrealistic expectations for the average consumer. In my experience, modern laptops only last 50 to 65 percent of their claimed battery life. For example: I recently reviewed the new Surface Pro, which actually…

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Source: The Next Web